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Edifa | Aug 31, 2020

A few simple words are enough to make true love blossom. And chances are you already know them!

In the course of his numerous speeches, Pope Francis has reiterated the fundamentals of our faith, wisely summing them up in a few plain words. Among other things he has told us is that our unions, conjugal or fraternal, must be inspired by love that comes from God. To make that union permanent, it must be “built on the rock of genuine affection” instead of “moving sands of emotions.” This love is based on a few simple words that must become a part of vocabulary in every household: Please, Thank you, and Sorry.

Meditating and adopting the right attitude

The word “please” is a signs of respect and consideration, vital in any relationship. We don’t force our love on others; we offer it to them. Our partner and children will undoubtedly be touched by such a thoughtful attitude.

“Thank you” is an expression of gratitude for what the other has given us. Sometimes, thanking our partner may seem excessive or even pointless. So why do we say it for something basic and self-evident? It’s simply because if our spouse didn’t do it, no one else would!

“Sorry” is recognition of the consequences of our actions, small and great. It soothes the hearer. It’s a sign of love we offer and share.

Recognizing that we’ve (consciously or unconsciously) wronged the other and asking forgiveness is undoubtedly a pinnacle of true love. It’s a treasure we don’t use often enough in the relationship with our partners.

Using these simple words every day leads to a fulfilling relationship. The humility thus generated opens us to the Lord and makes our love grow.

Marie-Noël Florant

When battered by life’s storms, or immersed in a dense fog of suffering and uncertainty, we may feel alone and unequipped to handle the circumstances.

Yet with words that echo through thousands of years into the corners of our hearts, the Lord says to us, “Do not fear: I am with you” (Isaiah 41:10).

He speaks these words not as one who merely observes our pain, but as one who experienced immense suffering. And the very wounds that bear witness to his suffering indicate the essence of our identity and worth: we are loved by God.

Reflecting on the healed wounds of the Risen Christ, we see that even our most difficult trials can be the place where God manifests his victory. He makes all things beautiful. He makes all things new.

Our Mission from Christ: Go

He is always with us. Jesus promised this when he gave the disciples the same mission he gives to each of us: Go.

Go be my hands and feet to a world enslaved by fear. Go to the woman who is unexpectedly pregnant and fears the future. Go to your friend who fears reprisal at work because he takes a stand for the protection of human life. Go to your aging parent in failing health who fears being a burden. And go to others, too, for their support.

We don’t need to have everything figured out. We can simply follow the guidance of Our Blessed Mother, the first disciple: “Do whatever he tells you” (John 2:5). Walk with each other. Do not be afraid to embrace God’s gift of life. Whatever storms or trials we face, we are not alone. He is with us.

“Behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age” (Matthew 28:20).

 

NABRE © 2010 CCD. Leccionarios I, II y III, Comisión Episcopal de Pastoral Litúrgica de la Conferencia Episcopal Mexicana, © 1987, Fifth Edition, September 2004. Copyright © 2017, USCCB, Washington, D.C. All rights reserved.